Dale C. Gunn's Family Geneaology -- Web Site 2007, 2008, 2009 by Dale C. Gunn
Notes for Alexander CAMPBELL

General Note
Alexander Campbell came to Schenectady in in 1762, while the later well-known firm of Phyn & Ellice was in business in 1768.

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Campbell, Alexander

A native of Scotland. He settled in Schenectady in 1762, later removed to Schoharie, but was again a resident of Schenectady on June 3, 1775, under orders never to return to Schoharie. In 1776 it being ascertained that he had warned Sir John Johnson of his danger, a mob burned his storehouse at Schoharie and later destroyed his store at Schenectady with goods and merchandise, "burning at the same time eight loads of hay and poisoning two milch cows." He was subsequently sent a prisoner to Connecticut, but on December 3 was permitted to return home on parole. In May, 1777, he was recommended to the field officers as "a dangerous person," and on May 3 was arrested to be taken to Albany but was released on his oath that he would take up arms in defense of the country in case of any invasion. On September 7, 1778, he refused to take the Oath of Allegiance, and requested permission of the Commissioners of Conspiracies to remove to Canada with his family. This request was granted and he was ordered to prepare himself to be removed on the shortest notice. He probably acted as a spy on various occasions, as his petition to the British Government for remuneration contains an item of 15 pounds 13 shillings, cash paid to sundry expenses in obtaining information of the situation of the Continental Army for Generals Burgoyne and Fraser.

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1.Alexander Campbell was sent a prisoner to Connecticut for having warned Sir John Johnson of his danger.

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1.In 1776, because of his action in warning Sir John Johnson (note , above), a mob burned the storehouse of Alexander Campbell at Sehoharie and later destroyed "his store at Schenectady with goods and merchandise burning at the same time eight loads of hay and poisoning two milch cows." Loyalists' Papers.

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1.Alexander Campbell was one of these (note , above). He was later released on parole.

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1.Daniel Campbell, James Ellice and others were under orders to remove, but at the last moment were permitted to stay on their signing the Oath of Allegiance. Alexander Campbell, John Doty (the rector of St. George's) and John Stuart (the Indian minister at Fort Hunter who was confined at Schenectady), were sent to Canada.



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Captain Alexander Campbell reg 84THR

b. 10/14 NOV 1734 Killin Perthshire Scotland

d. 24 Oct 1800 bur Johnstown UC

res Schenectady NY & Schoharie NY & Glengarry Co UC (UC=Upper Canada)

m 23 May 1768 Schenectady NY, Magdelena Van Sice

b. 29 Oct 1749 Schenectady NY

d c27 Jun 1829 bur Montreal QC

d/o John Van Sice & Mary La Force



Alexander Campbell (1734-1800) who was a Tory from Schnectady, New York. He later relocated to Montreal, Charlottenburg (Ontario) and finally at New Johnston, Ontario (he died in Montreal).

genealogy.com (family tree maker)

says born before 10 NOV 1734 in Margowan, Killin Parish , Scotland\



Schenectady County was formed from Albany County on March 7, 1809. It has a population of 147,000 (1/1/97 est ., eighteenth in New York State) and an area of 206 square miles, making it the second smallest in the state outside of New York City. The name "Schenectady" is derived from a Mohawk Indian word for "on that side of the pinery," or "near the pines," or "place beyond the pine plains."



"Alexander Campbell MLA (1734-1800) was a member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) in Upper Canada, a business man and an army officer. Prior to leaving his home at Killin Scotland Alexander was commissioned as an officer in the 42nd Regiment of Foot (the Black Watch). He and his brothers, Moses (b.1733) a sergeant, and James (b.1741) who were both with him in the Black Watch regiment when it landed at New York City in June 1756 were immediately dispatched to Albany New York to be trained in the art of bush fighting. Their first action in North America was in the summer of 1758, a tragic assault on the French fort at Ticonderoga. The Highlander failed to overcome the defenders and suffered 314 fatalities during the eight hour battle. Listed among the wounded was Lieutenant Alexander Campbell. After resigning his commission Alexander took up residence in Schenectady, NY. During the years prior to the American Revolution Alexander married twice and purchased large land holdings in the Mohawk Valley and owned and operated a store and tavern in Schenectady. Later he established another store in Schoharie, NY and in 1775 moved his family to Schoharie. However because he did not support the American rebels his store in Schoharie was looted and vandalized and so Alexander moved back to Schenectady. After Alexander moved back to Schenectady, his father-in-law Alexander Van Sice, a revolutionary, had Alexander and other Loyalists thrown in jail again for warning Sir John Johnston of his impending arrest thus giving Sir John enough lead time to round up his family and tenants and escape north to Canada. In 1778 Alexander after refusing to take an oath of allegiance to the rebels was expelled from the USA. Alexander was allowed to leave for Canada with only those possessions that could be carried in two wagons. After arriving in Montreal he moved his family to near New Johnstown (now called Cornwall) Ontario. From 1702 to 1797 Alexander was an MLA in Toronto, representing Dundas county west of Cornwall. Alexander was born in 1734 at Killin, Perthshire, Scotland the son of James Campbell and wife Elizabeth Buchanan. His first marriage was to Catherine Vetter in October 1765 at Christ Lutheran Church in New York City. Catherine died in 1767 and there is no record of any children from the marriage with her. Alexanders second wife was Magdalena Van Sice whom he married in May 1768 at the Dutch Reformed Church in Schenectady, NY. Alexander and Magdalena had 14 children: Catherine (1769-1772), Margaret (1771-1772), James (1774-1776), Margaret , James E ., John D., Alexander, Mary, Peter, Nancy, Elizabeth, Colin, Richard Duncan, and Catherine . Alexander died on October 24, 1800 at New Johnstown (Cornwall) Ontario. John Duncan Campbell (1773-1835) one of Alexanders 14 children later became a partner in the North West Company. When the North West Company joined with the Hudson Bay Company in 1821 he retired to Montreal and shortly after he married Eliza McDonald daughter of John Mcdonald of Garth another legendary partner of the North West Company. In 1824 Elizas father John sold the McDonald estate to John Duncan Campbell and Eliza. This home was named Inverarden and it remained in Campbell hands until 1965 when ownership was transferred to The Historic Sites and Monuments Board who operated Inverarden House as a museum. John Duncan Campbells great Grandson, James Alastair Grant Campbell BA LLB QC (b.1922 ) is a veteran of WWII, a former Crown Attorney for Carleton county Ontario and was Progressive Conservative Member of Parliament (MP) for Stormont county from 1958 to 1862 and was also a Member of the Municipal Board of Ontario.

Many of the families in the Red River Settlement were related back in Glengarry, Ont and prior to that in the Mohawk Valley where they settled after immigrating from Scotland.

http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/w/i/l/Serena-L-Willis/BOOK-0001/0 031-0001.html

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Fort Ticonderoga

Battles of the 42nd, 77th and 78th Highland Regiments with Lists of the "Killed and Wounded"



Thanks goes to Deborah for this series of articles, which she generously donated to The Canadian Military Heritage Project.

After years of warlike activity with France, England officially declared war on May 18, 1756, beginning the Seven Year's War in Europe. But the focus of the war soon shifted away from the continent to the colonies. Echoeing the conflicts in Europe, the final struggle for the empire was to take place in North America and in the West Indies. British regulars and American militia joined forces against France and her Indian allies in a campaign commonly known as the French and Indian Wars. After suffering numerous defeats and disappointments, England and her colonies successfully reversed the course of events and conquered the Canadian and regular armies of France. Peace between Britain and France was proclaimed with the signing of the Treaty of Paris on February 10, 1763; however, warfare against the Indians endured for sometime after.

The following accounts of the French-Indian Wars focus mainly on the involvement of the Highland Regiments in the battles and expeditions listed below. However, a list of other regiments involved, and the field officers in general command during these battles, have been noted in order to facilitate further research.

Battle at Fort Ticonderoga, July 7-8, 1758

Source: "Sketches of the Character, Manners and Present State of the Highlanders of Scotland; with details of The Military Service of The Highland Regiments", by Major-General David Stewart, Vol I & II, (1825), Edinburgh.

Highland Regiment: Lord John Murray's Highlanders of the 42nd Highland Reg. (1st Battalion) Other Regiments: the 27th, 44th, 46th, 55th, and the 1st & 4th battalions of the 60th Battle Under General Command of: Major-Generals Abercromby, Hopson, and Lord Charles Hay; Colonels Lord Howe and Forbes Abridged text: Ticonderoga is situated on a point of land between Lake Champlain and Lake George, and is surrounded on three sides with water, and on one half of the fourth side by a morass. The remaining part was strongly fortified with high entrenchments, supported and flanked by three batteries, and the whole front of that part was blocked up with felled trees, with their branches turned outwards, and their points first sharpened, and then hardened by fire; forming altogether a most formidable defence. The attack on Ticonderoga proved to be a disastrous and hopeless conflict.

The troops were embarked in boats at Lake George, and landing without opposition, were formed into two parallel columns. In this order they marched, on the 6th of July, to the enemy's advanced post, which was abandoned without a shot. The march was continued in the same order (July 7th), but the ground not having been previously examined, and the guides proving extremely ignorant, the columns came in contact, and were thrown in confusion. A detachment of the enemy, which got bewildered in the wood, fell in with the right column, at the head of which was Lord Howe. A smart skirmish ensued, in which the enemy were driven back and scattered, with considerable loss. This petty advantage was dearly purchased by the death of Lord Howe.

General Abercromby, perceiving that the men were fatigued, ordered them to march back to the landing-place, which they reached about eight o'clock in the evening. Next morning, (July 8th), he again advanced the attack, his operations being hastened by information obtained from the prisoners that General Levi, with 3000 men, was advancing to succour Ticonderoga. Alarmed at the report of this unexpected reinforcements, the General determined to strike a decisive blow before a junction could be effected. When the troops marched up to the entrenchments, they were surprised to find a regularly fortified breast-work, which could not be approached without the greatest exertions, particularly as the artillery had not yet been brought up. Unexpected and disheartening as these obstructions were, the troops displayed the greatest resolution, though exposed to a most destructive fire, from an enemy well covered and enabled to take deliberate aim, with little danger to themselves. The Highlanders, impatient at being left in the rear, could not be restrained, and rushing forward from the reserve, were soon in the front, endeavouring to cut their way through the trees with their broadswords.

No ladders had been provided for scaling the breast-work. The soldiers were obliged to climb up on each other's shoulders, and by fixing their feet in the holes which they had made with their swords and bayonets in the face of the work, while the defenders were so well prepared that the instant a man reached the top, he was thrown down. At length, after great exertions, Captain John Campbell, with a few men, forced their way over the breast-work, but were immediately dispatched with the bayonet. The General, despairing of success, gave orders for a retreat; but, the Highlanders in particular were so obstinate, that it was not till after the third order from the General that the commanding officer, Colonel Grant, was able to prevail upon them to retreat, leaving on the field more than one-half of the men, and two-thirds of the officers, either killed or desperately wounded. The next is an extract of a letter from an officer (Lieutenant William Grant), of the old Highland regiment containing apparently a candid detail of circumstances: "I have seen men behave with courage and resolution before now, but so much determined bravery can be hardly equalled in any part of the history of ancient Rome. Even those who were mortally wounded cried aloud to their companions, not to mind or lose a thought upon them, but to follow their officers, and to mind the honour of their country."

The 42nd was "first in the attack, and last in the retreat", and paid dearly with the loss of many lives and many severely wounded. However, due to the gallantry of the 42nd at Ticonderoga, letters of service were issued for adding a second battalion, and an order to make the regiment Royal, "as a testimony of his Majesty's satisfaction and approbation of the extraordinary courage, loyalty, and exemplary conduct of the Highland regiment."

The vacancies occasioned in the 42nd by the deaths at Ticonderoga were filled up in regular succession. The second battalion was to be formed of the three additional companies raised the preceding year, and of seven companies to be immediately recruited. The nation was highly satisfied with the conduct of the army; and the regret occasioned by the loss of so many valuable lives was alleviated by the hope, that an enterprise, so gallantly though unsuccessfully conducted, offered a fair presage of future success and glory.

The old Highland regiment having suffered so severely, and the second battalion being ordered on another service, (to the West Indies), they were not employed again this year.

42nd Highland Officers Killed (plus 9 sergeants, and 297 soldiers):

Major: Duncan Campbell of Inveraw.

Captain: John Campbell.

Lieutenants: George Farquharson; Hugh McPherson; William Baillie; and John Sutherland. Ensigns: Patrick Stewart, son of Bonskied; and George Rattray.

42nd Highland Officers Wounded (plus 10 sergeants, and 306 soldiers):

Captains: Gordon Graham of Drainie; Thomas Graham of Duchray; John Campbell of Strachur; James Stewart of Urrard; and James Murray of Strowen, son of Lord George Murray (and afterwards General).

Lieutenants: James Grant; Robert Gray; John Campbell; William Grant; John Graham, brother of Duchray; Alexander Campbell (this is our Alexander Campbell-RC); Alexander Mackintosh; Archibald Campbell; David Miller (Milne?); and Patrick Balneaves, son of Edradour.

Ensigns: John Smith; and Peter Grant.

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Bond of the Aldermen of Schenectady, 1766

http://www.scpl.org/history/schenectady/bond.html

The following is printed from the autograph copy, found among the Vrooman papers, of a bond given by the Aldermen and assistants of Schenectady, in 1766 to carry out certain measures in case of their being sworn into office. The orthography and capitalizing of the origin alis preserved throughout:

Know all men by these Presents, That wee John Sanders Caleb Beck Abraham Fonda Joseph R. Yattes, John Glen Junr. & Ryer Schermerhorn Esqrs. Ellected aldermen for the Borrough town of Schenectady, and Henry Glen, Nicolas Van Petten, John Visger Junr. Abm. Wemple, Nicholas DeGraaf , & Andries Truax Gentlemen Ellected Assistants for said Borrough, are Jointly & Severally held & firmly bound unto Isaac Vrooman & John Duncan Esqrs. of said Borrough in the sum of Five hundred Pounds Current Money of the Province of New York to be paid to the said Isaac Vrooman & John Duncan for which Payment well & truly to bee made wee hereby bind ourselves severaly & Joinly firmly by these Presents Sealed with our Seals dated this 5th. Day of Decr. 1766, in the Seventh Year of His Majestys Reign .

The Condition of this Obligation is Such That if the above Bounden Aldermen & assistants as above, Shall do well & truly Qualify in their respective Offices as aldermen & assistants for the Borrough of Schenectady within Eight days after the Governor Grants a New or additional Charter for the said Borrough with the Alterations or Amendments to the Present Charter of the following Articles Vizt. That the Boundarys of the Corporation shall be extended according to letters Pattent dated Novr. 6th. 1764, And that the Aldermen shall not be for life, but that they shall be Ellected Yearly or Every three years, as the Governor shall be pleased to Grant, And that none of the inhabitants of said Borrough shall be Oblig'd to take out a License for there Wagons but to use them at there will and Pleasure And that the Children of the Freeholders and free men give a Certain Sum Not Exceeding Six Shillings for there freedome then this Obligation to be Void and of no Effect otherwise to remain in full force.

Sealed and Delivered in the presence of us Matthew Lynd Alexander Campbell

John Sanders Caleb Beck Abraham Fonda Joseph R. Yates Jno Glen Jr.

Signed Sealed & delivered by Jno Glen Junr. for Ryer Schermerhorn, in Presence of us Alexander Campbell Edward Burrowes

John Glen Jr for Ryer Schermerhorn

Signed Seald & Delivered in the Presence of us By Andr. Truax John Visger Alexander Campbell

Henry Glen Nicolaes Van petten John Visger Jr. Abm Wempel Aendres Truax nicolas degraf

Source: Joel Munsell, Annals of Albany, I (1850) p. 368.

Schenectady City History | Schenectady History and Genealogy | SCPL Home Page | Overview

Found:

Alexander CAMPBELL c.14/11/1734, Killin - James/Elizabeth BUCHANAN (Batch No.C113612)

James CAMPBELL m. Elizabeth BUCHANAN 1732, Killin (Ref:Film 8816231)

Possible births for James:

c.18/8/1711 - John/Cathrine McClaren, Killin

c.14/8/1714 - Patrick/Jeane McDermite, Killin

Hope this helps,

Kind regards, Sue (Tropical North Queensland, Australia)

IGI Record Magdalena VAN SICE

Marriage(s): Spouse: Alexander CAMPBELL

Marriage: 23 May 1768

Schenectady, Schenectady, New York

Source Information: Film Number: 457789 & 458989 &

Batch #8816231 Sheet 13

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IGI Record Magdalena VAN SICE

Born: 29 Oct 1749

Schenectady, Schenectady, New York

Father: Johannes VAN SICE

Mother: Margarita FORT or La FORCE

Source Information: Film Number: 442667

Page Number: Reference Number: 69030

Batch number: 8816230 sheet 58

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42nd Foote Black Watch ==============================================================

From the History of Schenectady http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/resources/hanson/revwar_a_c.html

Campbell, Alexander

A native of Scotland. He settled in Schenectady in 1762, later removed to Schoharie, but was again a resident of Schenectady on June 3, 1775, under orders never to return to Schoharie. In 1776 it being ascertained that he had warned Sir John Johnson of his danger, a mob burned his storehouse at Schoharie and later destroyed his store at Schenectady with goods and merchandise, "burning at the same time eight loads of hay and poisoning two milch cows." He was subsequently sent a prisoner to Connecticut, but on December 3 was permitted to return home on parole. In May, 1777, he was recommended to the field officers as "a dangerous person," and on May 3 was arrested to be taken to Albany but was released on his oath that he would take up arms in defense of the country in case of any invasion. On September 7, 1778, he refused to take the Oath of Allegiance, and requested permission of the Commissioners of Conspiracies to remove to Canada with his family. This request was granted and he was ordered to prepare himself to be removed on the shortest notice. He probably acted as a spy on various occasions, as his petition to the British Government for remuneration contains an item of 15 pounds 13 shillings, cash paid to sundry expenses in obtaining information of the situation of the Continental Army for Generals Burgoyne and Fraser.

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http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/families/firstsettlers/br_ch.html

CAMPBELL

ALEXANDER, m. Magdalena, dau. of Johannes Van Seyse, May 23, 1768.

Ch. bp: Catrina, July 27, 1769;

Margarita, Mar. 31, 1771;

Margarita, May 27, 1776;

Catharine, wife of Alexander Campbell, d. July 12, 1767, a. 33ys.

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JAN (Johannes), son of Joseph, gunsmith, m. Margarita Fort, March 11, 1747/8.

Ch. bp:

Magdalena, October 29, 1749; Maria, Oct. 18, 1767;

Elisabeth, April 28, 1753; Joseph, June 29, 1755;

Rebecca, Nov. 6, 1757; Johannes, Aug. 19, 1759;

Cornelis, Nov. 1, 1761; Abraham, Nov. 27, 1763;

Simon, Sept. 1, 1765;

Magdalena, October 29, 1749, m. Alexander Campbell;

Maria, Jan. 1, 1769, m. Willem Pemberton; Daniel, Aug. 18, 1771.

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THE BLACK WATCH AT TICONDEROGA AND MAJOR DUNCAN CAMPBELL OF INVERAWE NEW YORK

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Description: Author: Frederick B. Richards. The Black Watch Regiment gained fame for its fearless charge

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Details Author: Frederick B. Richards.

The Black Watch Regiment gained fame for its fearless charge during Maj. Gen. James Abercrombie's futile attack on Ticonderoga in 1758, in which more than half of the 1000 Highlanders were killed or wounded in one of the most dramatic battles of the French and Indian War. At this battle, Major Duncan Campbell met his death, as foretold by a ghost several years earlier at his home at Inverawe, Scotland. The eerie legend is explained in this book, and was immortalized in Robert Louis Stevenson's poem "Ticonderoga." This small but comprehensive volume gives a history of the Black Watch Regiment from 1667. The Black Watch was also known as the 42nd Regiment of Foot, the Highlanders, the Royal Highlanders or Lord John Murray's Highlanders. Included in this work is a family history of the Campbells of Inverawe. Appendices A-S give a wide variety of information: regimental and company rolls; principal campaigns, battles, etc.; British and Provincial Regiments at Ticonderoga, 1758 and 1759; and biographical sketches of 31 officers of 1758 including Abercrombie, several Campbells, John Reid, James and Lord John Murray, and Thomas Stirling. Other appendices contain an original regimental list of the Black Watch; 1759 officers list; and references taken from Commissary Wilson's Orderly Book. A bibliography and copy of references to be found in the Canadian Archives round out this volume. This excellent resource is brimming with hundreds of names, and contains a fold-out map by Thomas Jeffreys of "The Plan of the Town and Fort of Carillon at Ticonderoga."

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The genealogical information here was obtained from public sources downloaded from the Family History Library's Family Search web site. I can make no representations regarding the accuracy or reliablility of this information. It is provided for information only. If you have any connections to, additional information, or changes on the above individuals, or any information related to the individuals and/or families on this site please email me to {dcgunn (at) gmail.com}. Thank you. 2007, 2008, 2009 Dale C. Gunn

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